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daily 03/20/2016

    • It states that for any proposition, either that proposition is true, or its negation is true
    • saying that it is necessary in every case to affirm or deny,[
    • An example of an argument that depends on the law of excluded middle follow
    • Aristotle wrote that ambiguity can arise from the use of ambiguous names, but cannot exist in the facts themselves:
    • Rosewill RHRC-13001 5.5 Cup Uncooked Fuzzy Logic Rice Cooker and Food Steamer, White
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      Build a Better Burger: Smoking

          By Todd • May 1st, 2011 • Category: How To Cook Burgers  

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      Who says you can’t teach an old dog new tricks? I found out this past week that, for all of my self-proclaimed grilling expertise- especially when it comes to burgers– that I still have much to learn. The lesson has come courtesy of a shiny birthday present from my wife, the newest weapon in my griller warfare arsenal:

       

       

      That, my burger-loving brothers and sisters, is a Big Green Egg. For those of you not familiar, it’s the United States’ most popular brand of kamado. A kamado (short for mushikamado) is a type of traditional Japanese cooker fueled by wood or charcoal. Kamados were historically made of earthen materials like clay, but modern versions are usually ceramic. The Big Green Egg’s unique shape is specifically designed to help the cooker retain heat far better than conventional grills, say the brand’s fans. These cult-like devotees, who call themselves Eggheads, swear that anything you can grill can be cooked better on an Egg: ribs, roasts, pizzas, whole turkeys, even breads and baked desserts. In a surprise to no one, I put mine to the test with burgers.

       

       

      Cooking with a Big Green Egg begins with lump charcoal.  Once the fuel of choice for only the most rabid of grillers, lump charcoal (whole pieces of wood that have been exposed to extremely high temperatures to expel all volatile chemicals, leaving behind pure carbon) is now pretty readily available.

       

       

      It weighs less than charcoal briquettes (thanks to a lack of fillers like wood or sawdust and because it’s not compressed into a uniform shape), but costs a lot more. The upside is that it burns much cleaner and way hotter than your granddaddy’s Kingsford. I can attest to that personally; just 15 minutes after lighting, the temp inside my Big Green Egg was over 500 degrees and still climbing.

    • argument, premises, and conclusion
    • Argument: a sequence of two or more statements of which one is designated as the conclusion and all the others of which are premises.
    • Premises: the statements which are affirmed as providing grounds for accepting the conclusion.
    • Those 1s and 0s are rooted in Boolean binary — an expression of Boolean logic, where every value or action is reduced to an answer of true or false.
    • As Zadeh wrote in the foreword to a 2013 edition of an academic journal dedicated to fuzzy logic, his use of words instead of numbers, as well as the attempt to incorporate imprecision, was heresy to many of his colleagues. “
      • huh what is the excluded middle?
    • Indeed, the very word fuzzy often has a negative connotation in the U.S. (see fuzzy math in politics), and goes against Western notions of logic, which are mostly built around the Aristotelian law of the excluded middle: in lay terms, the idea that a statement cannot be true and false at the same time.
    • If you ask someone how the temperature is, we don’t say 82.3 degrees. We say it’s warm.”
    • The appliance was either on or off, and it did but one thing while it was on. In my current fuzzy-logic cooker,
    • She pointed out that they are the natural child of two of Japan’s obsessions: rice and robots. Fuzzy logic is a subset of the artificial intelligence used in robots, and rice is so important in the diet that manufacturers are constantly looking for better ways to cook it.
    • “The funny thing is, the more research they do, the more they realize that the way they used to cook it with fire was the best way,”
    • She says the more advanced technology is in many ways just better at mimicking a very old cooking technique that involves a vessel called a mushikamado, which looks something like an igloo with the top cut off.
      • mushimakodo is the big green egg
    • Although Rosenhaus appears poised to take over Manziel’s business interests, the super-agent won’t have an easy time finding the former first-round pick a new NFL home. La Canfora notes (via Twitter) that multiple teams have suggested they have no interest in considering Manziel until (or unless) he commits to major life changes, including making real progress toward getting sober.
    • The new G7 X Mark II is still a great camera for taking selfies and vlogging thanks to its 3-inch touchscreen that flips a full 180 degrees upward. The addition of a Digic 7 image processor with significantly improved people and object-tracking, in-camera RAW conversion, timelapse movie mode and NFC are just a handful of new features that take the camera to the next level.
    • Autofocus performance is said to have been improved as well, particularly with regards to low contrast scenes and subject tracking. A new panning feature has been added as well, allowing users to photograph a moving subject with locked-on autofocus and automatic shutter speed adjustments to create motion blur in the background. Depending on the direction you’re panning, the camera’s Intelligent Image Stabilizer (IS) will automatically turn on or off.
    • Canon has introduced the PowerShot G7 X Mark II with a new DIGIC 7 processor, bringing much-needed improvements to camera performance. Maintaining its predecessor’s 20.1MP 1″-type CMOS sensor and 24-100mm equiv. F1.8-2.8 lens, the G7 X II brings some updates to the camera’s exterior as well, with a re-designed grip, bottom-hinged 3″ 1.04M-dot LCD and a front control dial that can switch between clicking or smooth-turning operation.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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