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daily 01/28/2015

    • Also, look beyond the numbers. Look at culture. Cook got rid of some assholes, like Scott Forstall, who was tight with Jobs but hated by everyone else.
    • He has expressed a commitment to sustainability, and when some dickhead challenged him about this at a shareholder meeting and said Apple should focus only on making as much profit as possible, Cook told him that Apple would do what was right and that if the guy didn’t like it he should get out of the stock.
    • Cook is a better CEO than Jobs ever was. Better at finance, personnel, continuous dynamic innovation, managing organizational change, etc.. It’s really not arguable.
    • The N.F.L. publishes a rule book each year titled the “Official Playing Rules of the National Football League.” Rule 7, Section 5 of the 2013 edition covers eligibility. It is that section that contains a rule so commonly adhered to that it goes unnoticed by most observers: There must be at least seven players on the line of scrimmage at the snap of each play.
    • Of those seven, only the two outside players are eligible to catch a pass. But not only are the two outside players the only ones on the line of scrimmage eligible to catch a pass, they must be eligible receivers.
    • What is an eligible receiver? The league requires that all offensive linemen (who are typically the ineligible receivers on the line of scrimmage) wear a numeral ranging from 50 to 79.
    • Defensive players are keenly aware of opposing players’ jerseys, and they mentally note that a player with a uniform number between 50 and 79 can be disregarded as a pass catcher.
    • The exception occurs when the offense declares such a player to be eligible to the referee, who then relays that message to the opposing team and to the fans.
    • If, for example, a team lined up two receivers to the right of the offensive line, and had both players on the line of scrimmage at the snap, then the outside wide receiver and the player in the nominal left tackle spot would be the eligible pass receivers.
    • That sort of thing rarely happens because a team would have to declare its left tackle to be eligible on the play, and there is little benefit to making a wide receiver ineligible just to make an offensive lineman eligible. But that is what the Patriots did against the Ravens.
    • New England kept just four offensive linemen in the game. New England then had tight end Michael Hoomanawanui (who wears No. 47) line up in the left tackle position. On one play, the Patriots lined up Hoomanawanui on the line of scrimmage, and placed two receivers to the right side on the line of scrimmage. That made the inside player of the two receivers, No. 34 Shane Vereen, ineligible, leaving Hoomanawanui and the outside receiver as eligible.
    • The “trick” here is that because Hoomanawanui was wearing the number of an eligible receiver, the Patriots did not need to announce that he was eligible.
    • To be fair, the referees did announce that No. 34 (Vereen) was ineligible, but that came just seconds before the snap.
    • (On the play, Vereen simply dropped back; had he run a route, he would have been flagged.)
    • In a bit of physics humor, Metzger then asked in the post whether Brian Greene of Columbia — one of the world’s best-known cosmologists — would “step up to the task.”
    • Zajc said he believed there was little chance that atmospheric effects alone could account for the discrepancies in the football pressure.

      “I think it’s more likely than not that they were manipulated,” Zajc said.

    • Captain McVay led the ship through the invasion of Iwo Jima, then the bombardment of Okinawa in the spring of 1945, during which Indianapolis anti-aircraft guns shot down seven enemy planes before the ship was struck by a kamikaze on March 31, inflicting heavy casualties, including 13 dead, and penetrating the ship’s hull. McVay returned the ship safely to Mare Island in California for repairs.
    • Later that year, Indianapolis received orders to carry parts and nuclear material to be used in the atomic bombs which were soon to be dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to Tinian. After delivering her top secret cargo, the ship was en route to report for further duty off Okinawa.
    • The Indianapolis immediately took a fifteen degree list, capsized and sank within 12 minutes. Of the crew of 1,196 men, 879 men died. It was the worst disaster at sea during the entire war for the US Navy.
    • About 300 of the 1,196 men on board died in the initial attack. The rest of the crew, more than 880 men, were left floating in the water without lifeboats until the rescue was completed four days (100 hours) later.
    • McVay was wounded but survived and was among those rescued. He repeatedly asked the Navy why it took five days to rescue his men, and he never received an answer.
    • There was much controversy over the incident. In November 1945, McVay was court-martialed and convicted of “hazarding his ship by failing to zigzag.”
    • Despite that testimony, the official ruling was that visibility was good, and the court held McVay responsible for failing to zigzag.
    • An additional point of controversy is evidence that the admirals in the United States Navy were primarily responsible for placing the ship in harm’s way.
    • Many ships, including most destroyers, were equipped with submarine detection equipment, but the Indianapolis was not so equipped, which casts the decision to deny McVay’s request for an escort as a tragic mistake.
    • Although about 380 ships of the U.S. Navy were lost in combat in World War II,[5] McVay was the only captain to be court-martialed for the loss of his ship.[6]
    • McVay also struggled throughout his life from vicious letters and phone calls he periodically received from grief-stricken relatives of dead crewmen aboard the Indianapolis.[10]
    • “Capt. McVay’s court-martial was simply to divert attention from the terrible loss of life caused by procedural mistakes which never alerted anyone that we were missing.”
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    • Bob Dylan – Shadows in the Night
       Release: Feb. 3
       Dylan proved he still had a lot to say with 2012’s Tempest, and he’s back with a set of new tunes this February. According to Dylan, there was an unconventional take to recording some conventional ballads—one that arranged 30+ piece songs for a five-piece band. The production was bare-bones, according to Dylan: “It was all done live. Maybe one or two takes. No overdubbing. No vocal booths. No headphones. No separate tracking, and, for the most part, mixed as it was recorded. I don’t see myself as covering these songs in any way. They’ve been covered enough. Buried, as a matter a fact. What me and my band are basically doing is uncovering them. Lifting them out of the grave and bringing them into the light of day.”
    • Even bigger than that is who Feig wants for the contemporary Walter Peck, the computer nerd dead-set on revealing the GHOSTBUSTERS efforts as a hoax: Pete Venkman himself, Bill Murray.

       

       

    • Drew also purports that they want Peter Dinklage to play the villain, “a creepy mechanical genius.” Stay tuned.

       

       

    • And they’re promoting lower oil prices, even at the cost of their own reduced revenue, because they know that it hurts Iran even more.
    • He is said to understand the socio-economic roots of jihadism and to have promoted job programs for wayward youth.
    • No American president would view the Middle East, or frame policies toward the region, simply in terms of a Sunni-Shiite battle.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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