Archive

Archive for August, 2014

daily 08/30/2014

August 30, 2014 Leave a comment
    • I have been shown Polish photographs from the beautiful summer of 1939: The children playing in the sunshine, the fashionable women on Krakow streets.
    • And now I have to ask: Should Ukrainians, in the summer of 2014, do the same? Should central Europeans join them?
    • Russian troops bearing the flag of a previously unknown country, Novorossiya, have marched across the border of southeastern Ukraine.
    • A far more serious person, the dissident Russian analyst Andrei Piontkovsky, has recently published an article arguing, along lines that echo Zhirinovsky’s threats, that Putin really is weighing the possibility of limited nuclear strikes—perhaps against one of the Baltic capitals, perhaps a Polish city—to prove that NATO is a hollow, meaningless entity that won’t dare strike back for fear of a greater catastrophe. Indeed, in military exercises in 2009 and 2013, the Russian army openly “practiced” a nuclear attack on Warsaw.
    • Germany was a latecomer to the world scene by the time the 19th century came to a close. The country only came into existence in 1871 when its various provinces were unified at the conclusion of the Franco-Prussian War.
    • Realpolitik
    • Weltpolitik
    • As noted by German Foreign Secretary Bernhard von Bulow in a statement to the Reichstag in 1897, “[In] one word: We wish to throw no one into the shade, but we demand our own place in the sun.” Indeed, the upstart nation was jealous at the success of its rivals, namely Britain, France, and the United States.
    • As for the USA, it had adopted the Monroe Doctrine some 50 years earlier — a policy aimed at curbing European colonial ambitions in North, Central, and South America.
    • The Kaiser, intent on defying the Monroe Doctrine, had plans to set up a major naval Caribbean base in Cuba or Puerto Rico.
    • The intent was never to take over the U.S., but rather to force the country’s leaders to bargain from a weak position.
    • Germany’s first plan, which was devised by Naval Lieutenant Eberhard von Mantey in 1898, was a scheme to attack U.S. naval power on its east coast in order to gain easy access to a planned German naval base in the Caribbean.
    • The Kaiser had von Mantey revise the scheme in 1899 — but this time he had to provision for a two-pronged land invasion of New York City and Boston.
    • By 1900, the Kaiser realized that an invasion force launched from Germany was unfeasible. He once again set his sights on a land base in Cuba from which such an invasion could be launched.
    • Seeking to gain a political advantage, they sought to establish a naval base in Culebra, Puerto Rico from where they could threaten the Panama Canal.
    • But world events would preclude Germany from ever embarking on such schemes. An invasion of the United States would have only been feasible if two conditions were met: (1) the absence of a major conflict in Europe and (2) an unprepared United States. By the first decade of the 20th century, these variables were withering away.
    • astute Big 12 fans can only shrug and laugh when they watch A&M and Auburn light up “a defensive league where that stuff won’t fly.”  
    • But the days of 11 defensive marionettes looking to the sideline for a brain transplant every thirty seconds are over.  The HUNH won’t allow it.
    • a product of a sophisticated HUNH spread system since he was a tween – now seemingly the default offense of Texas high school football) amassed 511 yards throwing to mostly wide open receivers in the middle of the field.  Frankly, it looked like a skeleton drill.
    • But the bigger realization could be that maybe they are pretty good – so long as their opponent will agree to play the game “properly.”
    • Why did South Carolina’s safeties keep looking to the sideline, imploring their coaches for guidance like a flopping Italian striker seeking a penalty kick?
    • Texas A&M’s Kevin Sumlin – like Auburn’s Gus Malzahan – isn’t very interested in honoring that implicit SEC agreement.
    • Malzahn’s masterful ability to pick apart schematic tendencies with simple alignment shifts.
    • There’s no doubt Hugh Freeze at Ole Miss wants to operate similarly, but the quality of the Rebel talent and the decision-making at QB is a natural governor on that engine.  For now.
    • Spurrier broke out of the doldrums of perennial 7-5 Gamecock seasons by – wait for it – recruiting really, really well.
    •  It has its pluses and minuses like any offense, but no offense flourishes more against a clueless opposition.
    • So here’s a bone, SEC coaches: start with some LSU film.  The Tiger roster isn’t exactly overrun with Rhodes Scholars, but John Chavis understands that complexity and pace is best dealt with stressing simplicity and assignment clarity.
    • Stressing broad applicable principles over specific play calls with good athletes is vastly preferable to a confused secondary staring to the sideline begging for their accustomed 30 second brain transplant and the perfect play call…that they won’t be able to execute in time.
    • “This post isn’t about the HUNH’s utter supremacy… In fact, some of the game plans executed against its best practitioners were done adeptly by SEC teams (Florida vs. OU, 2008).”

       

      When Florida beat OU in 2008, guess who was the DC for Florida? Answer: Charlie Strong

    • Congratulations, Buffalo. You get all the paranoia of Sean Payton with none of the playcalling acumen.
    • “If we just add marble countertops to the kitchen and redo the hardwood floors, we’ll be able to sell it for DOUBLE the asking price!”
    • There was only one piece of good news from the Bills offseason and that is that Jim Kelly says he is now cancer-free.
    • This was a team left to rot as Wilson grew older, and you can see it in both the roster and the fanbase. I can barely tell the difference between a Bills tailgate and a 1970s Manchester coal-plant union protest.
    • I watched a white trash couple down a multi-beer funnel being held up by their 8-year-old son while their infant roasted in the sun in a stroller surrounded by empty Bud Light cans. The whole time they were screaming “don’t call CPS!” at people who stopped to take pictures. Even if those kids survived that game, you know they have no chance.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Advertisements
Categories: Uncategorized

daily 08/29/2014

August 29, 2014 Leave a comment

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized

daily 08/28/2014

August 28, 2014 Leave a comment
    • Paying more than $100 million for a team as part of a public-private project deal led Beers to say, “I was shocked that the cost of acquiring the franchise was part of the term sheet given that teams are portable.”
    • But it’s hard to see D.C. welcoming back the team with open arms and open checkbooks, especially since half the senate and a majority of the city council have come out against the team name. But maybe that’s all part of Snyder’s plan. Maybe he knows the name has to change eventually, but he’s going to make sure he gets a huge, expensive new stadium out of it.
    • My friend and his friends drove back the whole length of the country, measuring their gas to the ounce and having a lovely conversation with a Texas State Trooper about how fast one should speed through Cormac McCarthy country. Their proposition was somewhere around 94 miles per hour; his counterargument, one enforced by local law, was one significantly lower.
    • Sense has never made a dent in how people fuck, drink, or watch football. They are inelastic ghosts with tin ears and large, bellowing mouths.
    • Notre Dame Stadium is as alien a landscape as there is in college football, a party in a mausoleum with wooden benches surrounded by what reasonably feels like a seminary.
    • Football started in the incubator of the northeast, went feral, and ran until it hit the West Coast, fanned back, and filled whatever lay in between.
    • The trip was 2,000 miles by train to Pasadena. The symbol on their luggage: a red elephant from Rosenberger’s Birmingham Trunk, Inc.
    • Contrary to what you might hear, you can outrun history. Both my great-grandfather and his father sprinted off the page completely, and into oblivion before my grandmother could make a single print of their faces. Every house feels like a coffin to me, but at least I came by that feeling honestly.
    • If “Too many SOQL queries: 101″ or “Too many DML statements: 151″ sounds familiar to you, chances are you have not properly bulkified your Apex code.
    • What does Bulk in the context of Salesforce1 mean?
    • It really means that certain areas of the Salesforce1 platform are optimized to process multiple records at a time. The most common areas where this concept applies are:
    • Data Loading — When loading data into Salesforce via the API or tools like the Data Loader or Workbench, records are processed in batches of up to 200 records at a time, rather than a single record at a time.
    • Triggers — Similar to traditional database systems, Salesforce1 has the concept of triggers on objects.
    • For example, if you’re loading data into Salesforce1 via the API and insert 1000 records into an object, only 5 API calls, with batches of 200 record each, are being made to insert the data.
    • data manipulation (inserting, updating, deleting and undeleting) of records in Apex code can be done in bulk as well,
    • . If any code ever exceeds a limit, the associated governor issues a runtime exception.
      • Total number of SOQL queries issued per transaction: 100
      •  

      • Total number of DML statements issued per transaction: 150
    • When working on bulkifying Apex code, there are two programming constructs that are important to understand: Sets and Maps.
    • Sets are unordered collections of distinct elements.
    • Maps are collections of key-value pairs where each unique key maps to a single value
    • In order for Apex code to function properly and respect the Governor limits, it needs to be written to operate in bulk as well.
    • One of the first things you learn in law school is that if a client doesn’t trust you, he’s won’t allow you to speak on his behalf in court
    • Alayne P. Conway, an Army public affairs officer, argues that reassigning a JAG—even from a death penalty case—will have a minimal impact on the attorney-client relationship because the civilian attorney, David Nevin (referred to as “Learned Counsel” within the commission setting) will remain on the case.
    • But in a letter dated Feb. 26 of this year, the Army notified Wright that they were taking him off the case. The letter required Wright to attend a nine-month graduate program in military law. Wright requested a deferral (which had been granted when he received the same order the year before), but this time the request was denied. In Wright’s eyes, the order clearly put him in conflict with his ethical obligation to continue representing his client, the third-highest ranking member of al-Qaida. When he followed up, Wright learned that even if he were to attend the graduate program, upon completion he would not be reassigned to U.S. v. Mohammed. His orders were short and unambiguous: either quit the KSM defense team and attend the graduate program, or resign from the Army.
    • He sees it as a JAG’s duty not merely to secure convictions of alleged terrorists, but to uphold the American system of justice.  
    • “At least within this office,” Wright says of the Mohammed defense team, “there is very much the viewpoint that we’re paid by the government to challenge the government.”
    • and hearsay evidence or admissions gained under torture were admissible. Several military prosecutors resigned in protest.
    • The Army’s reassignment of Major Wright away from U.S. v. Mohammed—which the defense team has portrayed as yet another symptom of lawlessness in Guantánamo—has only further diminished the appearance of legitimacy that Martins hoped to maintain.
    • A year ago today, I arrived in Black Rock City, Nevada, for Burning Man, the annual festival devoted to radical self-reliance and self-expression.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized

daily 08/27/2014

August 27, 2014 Leave a comment

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized

daily 08/26/2014

August 26, 2014 Leave a comment
Categories: Uncategorized

daily 08/25/2014

August 25, 2014 Leave a comment

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized

daily 08/24/2014

August 24, 2014 Leave a comment
    • “He wasn’t,” a writer said, “truly confident at all — that was his act.”
    • “We were a repertory company, and we knew that repertory companies do not feature one player. We thought we would all shine. When Chevy became the star, we felt hurt, we felt bad.”
    • “Chevy, I love you when you fall down/Every night on my TV,” the lyrics went. “But oh, Chevy, when you take that fall/I wish that you were falling, falling for me.”
    • “Chase is the only white gentile comedian around today. Think what that means when Johnny leaves.”
    • Lorne, although he purposely avoided pressuring Chevy, advised the same thing. His theory was that it took three years’ exposure to make a superstar on TV.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized