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daily 12/24/2013

    • SEOUL, South Korea — The execution of the uncle of Kim Jong-un, North Korea’s leader, had its roots in a firefight between forces loyal to Mr. Kim and those supporting the man who was supposed to be his regent, according to accounts that are being pieced together by South Korean and American officials. The clash was over who would profit from North Korea’s most lucrative exports: coal, clams and crabs.
    • But what is known suggests that while Mr. Kim has consolidated control and eliminated a potential rival, it has been at a huge cost: The open warfare between the two factions has revealed a huge fracture inside the country’s elite over who pockets the foreign currency — mostly Chinese renminbi — the country earns from the few nonnuclear exports its trading partners desire.
  • He runs after the horse.
    “Beef ‘O’ Brady!” the boy cries. “Come back!”
    There is no response.

  • Since Detroit tore down Lead Pipe Field in 1997, Candlestick Park has been America’s last Clue weapon stadium.

  • An MST3K snowflake I made for @iamadot Merry christmas @MST3KInfo http://t.co/P5wYzHYTXV

    • “It’s really important for myself and my family to get this cleared up,” Southwick said. “There was no process to properly adjudicate what happened. It’s really disappointing that it had to come to this.”
    • He said at least three other players testified against him. He maintained his innocence throughout, but coaches decided he should be dismissed, he told the TV station. Southwick acknowledged losing his temper after being accused.
    • A feast central to the Christian liturgical year, it closes the Advent season and initiates the twelve days of Christmastide, which ends after the twelfth night.[9]
    • The date of Christmas may have initially been chosen to correspond with the day exactly nine months after early Christians believed Jesus to have been conceived,[20]
    • one or more ancient polytheistic festivals that occurred near southern solstice (i.e., the Roman winter solstice); a further solar connection has been suggested because of a biblical verse[a] identifying Jesus as the “Sun of righteousness”.[20][21][22][23][24]
    • “Christmas” is a compound word originating in the term “Christ‘s Mass“. It is derived from the Middle English Cristemasse, which is from Old English Crīstesmæsse, a phrase first recorded in 1038[7] followed by the word Cristes-messe in 1131.[2
    • Xmas” is an abbreviation of Christmas found particularly in print, based on the initial letter chi (Χ) in Greek Khrīstos (Χριστός), “Christ”, though numerous style guides discourage its use;[32] it has precedent in Middle English Χρ̄es masse (where “Χρ̄” is an abbreviation for Χριστός).[31]

       

      Other names

    • he Chronography of 354 AD contains early evidence of the celebration on December 25 of a Christian liturgical feast of the birth of Jesus.
    • n 245, Origen of Alexandria, writing about Leviticus 12:1–8, commented that Scripture mentions only sinners as celebrating their birthdays, namely Pharaoh, who then had his chief baker hanged (Genesis 40:20–22), and Herod, who then had John the Baptist beheaded (Mark 6:21–27), and mentions saints as cursing the day of their birth, namely Jeremiah (Jeremiah 20:14–15) and Job (Job 3:1–16).[43
    • Many popular customs associated with Christmas developed independently of the commemoration of Jesus’ birth,
    • In English, the word Yule is synonymous with Christmas,[56] a usage first recorded in 900.
    • Dies Natalis Solis Invicti means “the birthday of the unconquered sun”. Some early Christian writers connected the sun to Jesus, who they believed was prophesied in Malachi 4:2 as the “Sun of Righteousness”
    • The conception of Jesus, known as the Annunication, became associated with the “spring equinox” while Christmas was thought to coincide with the “winter solstice”.[59
    • The Chronography of 354, an illuminated manuscript compiled in Rome, is an early reference to the date of the nativity as December 25.[65] In the East, early Christians celebrated the birth of Christ as part of Epiphany (January 6), although this festival emphasized celebration of the baptism of Jesus.[66]
    • In the Early Middle Ages, Christmas Day was overshadowed by Epiphany, which in western Christianity focused on the visit of the magi.
    • The forty days before Christmas became the “forty days of St. Martin” (which began on November 11, the feast of St. Martin of Tours), now known as Advent.[4
    • Around the 12th century, these traditions transferred again to the Twelve Days of Christmas (December 25 – January 5); a time that appears in the liturgical calendars as Christmastide or Twelve Holy Days.[46]
    • It was during the Reformation in 16th–17th-century Europe that many Protestants changed the gift bringer to the Christ Child or Christkindl, and the date of giving gifts changed from December 6 to Christmas Eve.[69]
    • The Parliament of Scotland officially abolished the observance of Christmas in 1640, claiming that the church had been “purged of all superstitious observation of days”.[72] It was not until 1958 that Christmas again became a Scottish public holiday.[73]
    • The ban by the Pilgrims was revoked in 1681 by English governor Sir Edmund Andros, however it was not until the mid-19th century that celebrating Christmas became fashionable in the Boston region.[50]
    • Christmas fell out of favor in the United States after the American Revolution, when it was considered an English custom.[75] George Washington attacked Hessian (German) mercenaries on the day after Christmas during the Battle of Trenton on December 26, 1776, Christmas being much more popular in Germany than in America at this time.
    • Many apps have command line switches you can use to perform more specific tasks.
    • Use Batch Files to Do Anything You Can CodeP

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