Archive

Archive for May, 2013

daily 05/31/2013

May 31, 2013 Leave a comment

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized

daily 05/30/2013

May 30, 2013 Leave a comment
    • Python Introduction

         

            

        

        

      Python is a dynamic, interpreted language.

    • Source code does not declare the types of variables or parameters or methods.
    • some web pages, so you know HTML, CSS and maybe JavaScript. By and large, it is difficult to find students who have any exposure to languages beyond this. And this is a shame because there are a number of programming languages

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized

daily 05/27/2013

May 27, 2013 Leave a comment

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized

daily 05/26/2013

May 26, 2013 Leave a comment
    • Trees? Nested objects and parent child relationships? SQL just laughs in your face and gives you a massive flat table saying, “You figure it out bro.”
    • I can use SQLite to prototype a simple data model for a web application, or a phone, or a desktop application in quick order and know it will work just about everywhere that has SQLite.
    • SQL then gives you a language for doing CRUD operations on these to produce new tables or alter existing ones.
    • OOP languages are organized around graphs, but SQL wants to only return tables.
    • ternary relationships and attributed relationships,
    • “The most important thing I’ve learned about writing is never write too much at a time,” Hemingway said, tapping my arm with his finger. “Never pump yourself dry. Leave a little for the next day. The main thing is to know when to stop. Don’t wait till you’ve written yourself out. When you’re still going good and you come to an interesting place and you know what’s going to happen next, that’s the time to stop. Then leave it alone and don’t think about it; let your subconscious mind do the work. The next morning, when you’ve had a good sleep and you’re feeling fresh, rewrite what you wrote the day before. When you come to the interesting place and you know what is going to happen next, go on from there and stop at another high point of interest. That way, when you get through, your stuff is full of interesting places and when you write a novel you never get stuck and you make it interesting as you go along.”
      • The Blue Hotel by Stephen Crane
      • The Open Boat by Stephen Crane
      • Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
      • Dubliners by James Joyce
      • The Red and the Black by Stendhal
      • Of Human Bondage by Somerset Maugham
      • Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
      • War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
      • Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann
      • Hail and Farewell by George Moore
      • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
      • The Oxford Book of English Verse
      • The Enormous Room by E.E. Cummings
      • Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
      • Far Away and Long Ago by W.H. Hudson
      • The American by Henry James
    • “That would be swell,” replied Samuelson, and so began a year-long adventure as Hemingway’s assistant.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized

daily 05/25/2013

May 25, 2013 Leave a comment
    • A string is how you make something that your program might give to a human. You print them, save them to files, send them to web servers, all sorts of things.
    • Now you can print things with print and you can do math
    • In programming a variable is nothing more than a name for something so you can use the name rather than the something as you code.
    • Can we write x=100 instead of x = 100?

       

      You can, but it’s bad form. You should add space around operators like this so that it’s easier to read.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized

daily 05/24/2013

May 24, 2013 Leave a comment
    • It’s easy…very easy…to quickly assail Steven Moffat for the ‘downs’ of this Season/Series – and many have done so loudly and summarily.
    • If we clear our heads and approach the matter objectively, I submit that there’s actually very little fundamentally ‘wrong’ with S7 from a conceptual or storytelling perspectiv
    • , S7 still managed to masterfully insert a few over-arcing notions which very much influenced the whole…but did this so cleverly and so subtlety that viewers often didn’t track that they were observing meaningful moves. 
    • when the Great Intelligence sets out to re-write the Doctor’s history, citing his ‘blood soaked’ behavior as one motivation for doing so.  
    • The poignance of this conceit can not be overstated  – someone whose very purpose for being is more or less defined by potentially endless acts of self-sacrifice in the name of someone else, and the ideals they represent.
    • With so much going for it, why didn’t DOCTOR WHO feel like t worked as well as it should have this year? 
    • What DOCTOR WHO tried to be…what it wanted to be on paper…simply never made it to screen this year.  
    • In short, the PRESENTATION of DW stopped ‘impressing’ – it stopped feeling as special as it used to. 
    • In the case of WHO this year, one of the primary complaints voiced by viewers is that they had difficulty ‘connecting’ with the show.  Well, every single one of the factors outlined above PROFOUNDLY impacts one’s connection to what is happening on screen.  Atmosphere affects how we connect.  Tempo of editing affects how we connect.  Even a camera angle affects how we connect.  To see if this theory holds water, run a test.  
    • I’m not so sure DW has lost its way – I strongly suspect something else is happening.   I’d bet good money that DOCTOR WHO is being slammed by yet-to-be revealed challenges on the production side
    • We’re getting different editors than we’ve had in the past.  Different DPs.  Different ilks of directors.  Different FX houses.
    • Nightmare in Silver, for examplewhich writer Neil Gaiman openly indicated was altered considerably from his vision…felt a long way off from refined in terms of story clarity and script.
    • Sometimes, the talk was bigger than the show could deliver under many circumstances…especially under the channeling ones posited above. 
    • Sometimes, playing it cool is the best way to not attract attention, or set expectations too high.
    • Recalling one of the factors I mentioned above – the new FX house. The “little things” mean EVERYTHING on shows and movies, especially ones of this nature. 
    • We all lose our groove and feel scrambled during transitions or hectic times, but it’s our approach that determines the outcome.
    • If you get lost, do the laundry.
    • gainst the Kansas Jayhawks in the eighth game of the 2012 season, Art Briles finally replaced Jared Salubi in the “lightning” part of Baylor’s “thunder and lightning” tailback combo and began to give more carries to Oregon transfer Lache Seastrunk.
    • Perhaps more worrisome, at the same time that Seastrunk was elevated over Salubi, the Baylor defense slowly improved into a mediocre-to-decent unit. There was precious little on film from the 2012 season that indicated how one might go about stopping the Baylor attack.
    • there are some defensive responses that just might be executed someday on a level comparable to how Baylor’s offense performs on a weekly basis.
    • TCU and Iowa State placed a lot more trust in their linebackers and were thus able to achieve the essential goal of stopping the Baylor running game. In
    • If you can avoid being gashed by the Bears’ run game, their explosive play-action strikes become considerably less dangerous. It’s also more difficult to complete accurate screen passes than it is to hand the ball to a back.
    • However, if you’re going to leave your linebackers on the field to try and stop Baylor, you’ll have to help them out a lot with your alignments.
    • If you do any kind of storytelling for a living, these are probably basic ideas … but maybe not.
    • The event that gets the action going is a solar flare so powerful that it knocks the planet Mercury out of its orbit and sends it hurtling toward Earth. This would be bad.
    • NOBODY WILL LISTEN TO HIM.
    • It just so happens that this disgraced scientist’s wife is an astronaut whose spacecraft is — you won’t believe this — orbiting Mercury. But the solar flare hit the ship so hard that a little while later, the other astronaut on board keels over and dies.
    • I have only scratched the surface of how stupid on every level this movie is. But we watched the damn thing all the way to the end. When it was over, I looked at my wife and said, “Why did we do that?” But the truth is, I knew why.
    • story is the journey of this character you care about, confronting and dealing with this obstacle, to reach this pot of gold.
    • What’s the story about?
    • What’s it REALLY about?
    • What the story’s REALLY about is a way of saying, what’s the point? What’s the universal meaning that someone should draw from this story? What’s the lesson?
    • The obstacle is Rocky’s own self-doubt.
    • That’s what makes stories matter: when you read or watch or hear a story about a total stranger, in a completely different world, and you recognize that story as your own.
    • Because I was reminded, once again, that a good story can save us all.
    • This brings us to one of the most interesting and controversial things about the Ouya: All games have to be free to download, but can offer in-app-purchases.
    • In reality, Ouya’s system is pretty similar to Xbox Live Arcade, which requires all games on the service to offer a free demo.
    • Stalagflight is totally free, but you can “buy pizzas” (in-game items that do nothing) to support further development of the game. (Apple, Ouya says, does not support this sort of donation-based model.)
    • My great fear for the Ouya has been that it will become a dumping ground for ports of mobile games from big, successful publishers and established indies.
    • It’ll show up at retailers like Target, Amazon, Best Buy and Gamestop on June 25, but since I backed the project on Kickstarter, I got my hands on an early unit.
    • The beauty of the game is its super-realistic physics system, which punishes you in comical ways when you do dumb stuff,
    • While Ouya developers cannot distribute copyrighted game ROMs, downloading the emulator software and then finding the ROMs online is trivially easy. With its low price point and comparatively fast processors, Ouya may soon become the best way to enjoy classic games on a high-definition television, once more developers pile aboard and optimize their Android emulators for it. Of course, you’ve got to be a pirate to do it.
    • She was arrested on charges of reckless endangerment, tampering with evidence and criminal possession of marjuana. She was later taken to Roosevelt Hospital for a psychiatric evaluation.
    • The doorman at Bynes’ building on West 47th Streeet called police to report she was smoking marijuana in the lobby, sources said. When officers arrived, Bynes had gone back to her apartment on the 36th floor.
    • “The reluctance to embrace the crisis situation in which the court finds itself is disturbing,” the review says. “It evidences a complacent attitude among court leaders and an unwillingness to act…
    • In parliamentary systems, the executive is bound by the decisions of the legislature (at least in theory).
    • “The great security against a gradual concentration of the several powers in the same department consists in giving to those who administer each department the necessary constitutional means and personal motives to resist encroachment of the others.”
    • Other presidents have also narrowly interpreted, or simply violated, the War Powers Resolution, as President Clinton did during the conflict with Serbia in 1999.
    • By allowing such examples of executive muscle flexing, Congress has ratified them. That is how our system works.
    • Friedersdorf takes the both-are-lawless path, and gets points for consistency, but he is tilting at windmills—both parties and mainstream public opinion support a president who can forcefully counter threats.
    • Instead, it has acknowledged that its authority under domestic law derives from Acts of Congress, not just the President’s vague constitutional powers.” (I have added the emphases.)
    • The rhetorical smiley faces in Obama’s speech should fool no one.
    • The speech thus may well confirm the view among Obama’s civil libertarian critics that he is the most lawless executive since, um, George Bush. They are right to see the continuity from one president to the next, but they are wrong to believe that Obama has violated the law.
    • The 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force, updated in the 2012 National Defense Authorization Act, gives the president war powers against al-Qaida
    • Critics argue that the Obama administration violated the rights of the Islamic cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, an American citizen killed by drones in Yemen, by failing to capture him and give him a trial.
    • Conor Friedersdorf, in a cogently written piece, points to President Obama’s refusal to prosecute Bush administration officials for torture and war crimes
    • If the president believes that the torturers would not be convicted because they had official immunity based on the Justice Department’s opinions about the legality of the interrogations at the time, or that a jury would acquit, or even that prosecutions would interfere with his political agenda, he may decline to prosecute.
    • The Obama administration argued that the War Powers Resolution did not apply to Libya because the 60-day clock begins to tick in the event of “hostilities,” and this means something more warlike than the limited air attacks in which the U.S. engaged.
    • This is a polite way for the president to do what he wants without explicitly defying Congress. (There is even a legal doctrine that reflects this principle; it’s called the “canon of avoidance”).
  • tags: TheWeightOfGlory

    Obedience is the road to freedom, humility the road to pleasure, unity the road to personality. #TheWeightOfGlory

    • It’s a trick to make your brain not attach meaning to each part of the code, and doing that makes you process each piece exactly. This catches errors and is a handy error checking technique.
    • If a programmer tells you to use vim or emacs, tell them, “No.” These editors are for when you are a better programmer.
    • “When all of the python code on your computer is Python 3, then I’ll try to learn it.” That should keep them busy for about 10 years.
    • A programmer will eventually tell you to use Mac OSX or Linux. If the programmer likes fonts and typography, they’ll tell you to get a Mac OSX computer. If they like control and have a huge beard, they’ll tell you to install Linux.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized

daily 05/22/2013

May 22, 2013 Leave a comment
      • With the help of this book, you will do the incredibly simple things that all programmers need to do to learn a language:

         

        1. Go through each exercise.
        2. Type in each sample exactly.
        3. Make it run.
    • Reading and Writing, Attention to Detail, Spotting Differences
    • By going through this book, and copying each example exactly, you will be training your brain to focus on the details of what you are doing, as you are doing it.
    • Do Not Copy-Paste
    • If you copy-paste, you are cheating yourself out of the effectiveness of the lessons.
    • o me repetitive practice is natural and just how to learn something.
    • As you study this book, and continue with programming, remember that anything worth doing is difficult at first. Maybe you are the kind of person who is afraid of failure so you give up at the first sign of difficulty.
    • Maybe you never learned self-discipline so you can’t do anything that’s “boring”. Maybe you were told that you are “gifted” so you never attempt anything that might make you seem stupid or not a prodigy.
    • Go learn Lisp. I hear people who know everything really like Lisp.
    • For everyone else who’s here to learn, just read everything as if I’m smiling and I have a mischievous little twinkle in my eye.
  • @cshonea We have Max’s glove at our house. Consider this a random note.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized