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Archive for February, 2013

daily 02/28/2013

February 28, 2013 Leave a comment
    • But when you manage a company, short term consideration must be trumped by the far more critical decisions that will ensure the survivability of the company and its prosperity in the very long-term. As in the next 20 years, not only the next three.
    • What most people may not realize or simply choose to ignore is that Apple is facing the most critical strategic juncture in its history. Let me try to explain: Apple’s magnificent growth in the last decade can be credited to its visionary ability to understand the world around it and anticipate the social and cultural trends that will shape consumers’ needs and wants in the future (read more on this here).
    • It all has to do with the ever shortening sustainability of technological advantages, the proliferation of devices that is saturating the market and the consumer, and with that, the commoditization of technology.
    • Anything more portable than an iPhone presents, not technological limitations, but human limitations
    • Therefore, in the long run Apple’s success strives in moving from a hardware-centric company to a content-centric company.
    • Apple’s only strategic alternative to expand and lock-in the eco-system it has built is to morph again and become the complete owner of that next layer.
    • “Moving the goal posts” isn’t a concept that actually makes any sense in the context of replacing the sequester. The whole point of the policy was to buy time until someone, somehow, moved the goalposts such that the sequester could be replaced.
    • The point was to give both sides a face-saving way to raise the debt ceiling even though the tax issue was stopping them from agreeing to a deficit deal.
    • If President Obama won, then that, too, would pretty much settle it: The American people would’ve voted for the guy who wants to cut the deficit by increasing taxes.
    • The American people voted for the guy who wants to cut the deficit by increasing taxes.
    • They also voted for a Senate that would cut the deficit by increasing taxes.
    • Boehner and Obama were at one point close to a big deal, and then Boehner pulled the plug for fear of a rebellion on his right:
    • In June of 2011, the President and the Speaker began working toward a Grand Bargain of major tax increases and spending cuts to address the government’s long-term budget deficits.
    • Cantor told me that it was a “fair assessment” that he talked Boehner out of accepting Obama’s deal.
    • Boehner needs to acknowledge that Obama has repeatedly been offering the kind of large spending cuts that Republicans say they want, and learn to take yes for an answer.
    • But over the last year, Samsung, the South Korean manufacturer, has been quietly beefing up the Google Android software that runs on its smartphones to give businesses a phone with more security.
    • So this tells us a little bit about the personality of different teams’ passing games. West Virginia’s Air Raid throws 71 percent of its passes within 10 yards of the line of scrimmage, while Washington State’s throws about 62 percent that distance.
    • while Baylor loves the 5-9 yard routes.
    • Johnny Manziel’s percentages are interesting. He was as good as anybody on the super-short passes (<5 yards), decent from 5-14 yards, great from 15-19 yards and pretty spotty on anything deeper.
    • It is one of the top manufacturers of the crucial components — flash memory, DRAM, LED screens and OLEDs — that everyone else has to buy. Even when Samsung loses market share, it still wins.
    • “There is a threat from Samsung to Google that is real,”
    • The company will also eventually find itself on the horns of the killer product dilemma. Samsung has always been a great fast follower.
    • David Displeases the Lord by Taking a Census
      • why was this a bad thing?
    • But the king’s edict stood, despite the objections of Joab and the leaders of the army. So Joab and the leaders of the army left the king’s presence in order to muster the Israelite army.
      • wadi is an arroyo

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daily 02/27/2013

February 27, 2013 Leave a comment

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daily 02/26/2013

February 26, 2013 Leave a comment
    • Tony Sartor — whose STV deal had died a quiet death soon after it became public — responded to another hike in the price of the PATH station by telling Ward, “I would like to get a true assessment of what the costs are going to be, for the hub and the rest of the project,” as if Ward were the one who’d sired the Calatrava and then blown smoke for seven years about its costs and construction.
    • With Sartor leading the way, the PA started threatening to shut down funding for the museum if the museum didn’t pay a larger share of the infrastructure costs.
    • But it was Sartor’s New Jersey colleague, PA commissioner David Steiner, who reminded everyone that the Calatrava — not the Freedom Tower, not the Memorial Museum — was Ground Zero’s true icon.
    • “The Port Authority is one gigantic business negotiation that goes on forever and never ends — there’s always a transaction going on. And the only way to lead the Port Authority is by understanding that.”
    • There was some concern, of course, about constructing the actual building. Those wings might prove tricky, the dome’s expanse of exposed glass could pose a security risk — given the dark attraction of Ground Zero — plus the hub’s specific location meant that much of its below-ground ceiling would also be the floor of the yet-to-be-built Memorial Plaza, not to mention that one of the wings, when spread, would come perilously close to a yet-to-be-built office tower next door
    • Every three months, the consultants issued another update reporting problems with design, scheduling, and oversight.
    • created a cross-project governing board to coordinate planning across the whole sixteen acres.
    • By then, though, Ward was a dead man walking.
    • Silverstein would build three smaller office towers on the WTC site, but not the Freedom Tower. That belonged to the Port Authority again.
    • To nobody’s surprise and David Childs’s despair, Durst found costs to cut, particularly at the top and bottom of the tower. The prismatic glass chosen to wrap the base of the building was replaced with a cheaper version, requiring that the corners of the tower’s first two hundred feet be squared off after those corners had already been tapered to meet the thousand-foot isosceles triangles of the curtain wall.
    • PATH stands for Port Authority Trans-Hudson, the railroad winding seventy feet below the World Trade Center site, carrying commuters to and from New Jersey at a loss of almost $400 million per year.
    • The logic seemed solid: The railroad was a crucial regional transportation link, and the Port Authority’s purpose was to manage the region’s transportation fairly, and the PA had clearly destroyed the railroad.
    • They explain why the PA is still viewed — by New York and New Jersey, and by bond traders, too — as a fount of infinite wealth:
    • Why is the Port Authority building a new PATH hub there that will cost around $4 billion by the time it’s finished?
    • How in the world can an eight-hundred-thousand-square-foot transit station cost $4 billion?
    • and give, New Jersey ample opportunity to freely, fully wet its beak.
    • “This is the Port Authority’s gift to New York City,” said Calatrava.
    • Our pleasure, said the Port Authority, perhaps especially pleased that nobody seemed to notice that its $2 billion jewel of a PATH hub would serve about 50,000 commuters daily, a sliver of Penn Station’s 600,000 or Grand Central’s 750,000 — and that no one was unkind enough to mention how much money the PA was already losing on the railroad each and every year.
    • The land itself is owned by the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey, created more than ninety years ago to manage the movement of goods and people into and out of New York City at a time when there were no major bridges, tunnels, or airports linking the two states. T
    • Tobin used the PA’s power of eminent domain to seize those sixteen acres and erect the Twin Towers, the world’s two tallest buildings when they were completed in 1973, steamrolling the city’s private real estate developers, who found it unsporting that a regional transportation agency would flood New York with more than ten million square feet of office space for lease.
    • His sole legacy was a new forty-three-story office tower a block north of Ground Zero — the gleaming global headquarters of Goldman Sachs. That baby opened in 2009, complete with a fifty-four-thousand-square-foot gym plus a reading lounge, at a cost of more than $2 billion, underwritten by George Pataki, who handed Goldman $1.65 billion of the Liberty Bonds — pledged by the U. S. Congress shortly after 9/11 to help rebuild the World Trade Center — after the firm bluffed a move to flee New York City and take thousands of jobs with i
    • The plaza finally provided the kin a mourning place, and it also seemed like solid evidence of momentum.
    • Forget the details for now and focus on a simple fact: The Port and the politicians who run it are pigs.
    • Pataki is the yutz responsible for nearly all that has gone wrong in rebuilding the site, but they couldn’t not invite him.
    • And Andrew Cuomo says to Pataki, “This is the biggest waste of money anybody’s ever seen. Who would have ever spent this money? If we’d known what this was going to be like, nobody would have ever done this.”

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daily 02/24/2013

February 24, 2013 Leave a comment

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daily 02/23/2013

February 23, 2013 Leave a comment

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daily 02/22/2013

February 22, 2013 Leave a comment
    • Quote Originally Posted by THujone  View Post 

       

      Bottom line is: if you act like you’re winning, the jury will think you’re winning.

         

       

       

      Good Lord, this, so much this. I dont care if they understand me, I just want them to believe me.

    • So she decides to express that right before the sentencing phase? Isn’t it basic knowledge not to directly insult the people you’re trying to sway to your side? She might be pissed, she might be taking it personally, but if I’m in the Griffin family I’m pissed too because the DA let her emotions get in the way of making a cogent and coherent argument for jail time. Her argument is that the defendant is rich and men tried to go easy on her because they want to $#@! her.
    • If I made my living developing apps, I might be thinking to myself at this point “Huh. That means I can precisely mimic how an app will look and behave on the touchscreen of a Nexus 10, while having just enough screen real estate left for a toolbar. And I have a full-sized physical keyboard. Which means, in turn, that I can do my coding and my testing very easily on the same device.
    • For example, it’s very convenient that it was tending to her phone’s alarm that distracted her, and not a text or phone call (that there would be records of).
    • As students shuffled out, Roth reminded them, “A short reflection on this film is due next time. And please! Don’t summarize, analyze. Why is this important? How does it connect to other things we learned?”
    • eems essential “to getting your thoughts out”: thesis, evidence, analysis, and conclusion. “Did you organize your thoughts in a way that made sense?” he asked her. “Did you back up your opinions with evidence? Did you go deep enough?”
    • Roth waited until the last student had left the room, and we looked over Maria’s test together. She got almost all the answers wrong on the practice multiple-choice section, the only one that would have counted for the state. On Roth’s essay question, she got an A+.
        
    • Given all that, it’s no surprise that much of the debate is reduced to stereotypes. Waiting for “Superman” is a perfect distillation of education clichés, pitting charter schools run by enthusiastic reformers against sclerotic unions and incompetent administrators.
    • “I have seen about 20 rounds of classroom reform in my teaching career,” Roth told me recently. “You know what I haven’t seen? Serious dialogue with teachers, students, and parents. They can identify successful teaching, but they are rarely a part of the discussion.”
    • And from Paul’s letter to the Ephesians,

”And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you.”
    • Probation makes sense. And at the same time, they will suspend her license and impose community service. Prohibit her from entering establishments where alcohol is sold, or consuming alcohol.
    • The 69th District Attorney David Green said the case fell short of negligence, which usually includes factors like “speeding, racing, failure to use brakes, ignoring construction zones, or ignoring traffic signs,” the Amarillo Globe-News reported.
    • Surprised at the mediocre poor public speaking skills by both attorneys. There’s no consistent use of the leitmotifs that emerged during the trial, no real narrative being driven, nothing. It’s just lists of the reasons why they argue they won. Making those points outside of a well constructed contextual framework doesn’t seem to deliver them with the greatest intellectual or emotional oomph.
    • i read where typical punishment is 6 months to 2 years probation for her verdict. the griffins are going to go bat$#@! cray if that happens, especially the sister, whose eyes were popping out of her skull during the livestream on tuesday.
    • For instance, in a brewing conflict over Taiwan or the South China Sea (areas where China has asserted claims aggressively in recent years), would an American president respond with full military force if he knew that the Chinese would retaliate by turning out all the lights on the Eastern Seaboard?
    • A familiar concept in strategic war games is “escalation-dominance.” The idea is that victory goes to the player who can take a conflict to the next level of violence in a way that inflicts enormous damage on his opponent but very little on himself. The expected outcome of the next round is so obvious that the opponent decides not to escalate; the dominant player thus controls the subsequent course of the battle and possibly wins the war.
    • Last summer, all of a sudden, a computer virus nicknamed Shamoon erased three-quarters of the Aramco oil company’s corporate files, replacing much of it with images of a burning American flag.

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daily 02/20/2013

February 20, 2013 Leave a comment
    • I’ve explained it this way — some lawyers would attack Japan by capturing each and every island in the Pacific along the way, because the Japanese have no right to be there, and once they capture them all, then surely an isolated Japan will fall. Other lawyers use the island-hopping campaign strategy — capture the islands you need to launch your final attack on Japan, and defeat them. So, establish the facts necessary to preserve your verdict on appeal, but otherwise, establish the facts that convince the jury that your side should win. Your only goal is the defeat of Japan. If you leave an opportunity for a small win on a certain point on the table to get there, who gives a damn? Read your audience, give them what they need to hear, and win.
  • Don’t let your happiness depend on something you may lose. – CSLewis http://t.co/9oxp35Fj

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