Archive

Archive for October, 2011

daily 10/31/2011

October 31, 2011 Leave a comment
    • Keep in mind that Vitamin A, & anything acidic like fruit juices or cola increases the excretion, reduces absorptions & lessens the effects of any amphetamine. So it is best to drink water. Anything that reduces stomach acid or that increases the alkalinity of your stomach increases the absorption of amphetamines & lessens urinary excretion thus prolonging its duration of action. Baking Soda, which is very alkaline, is the best agent for this purpose- On the side of the Arm & Hammer box is a recipe for Baking Soda antacid. If you take this with your amphetamine you will notice a huge difference.
    • So…as of October 28, 2011, the FDA reported that Immediate Release Mixed Amphetamine Salts (Adderall and generics) are delayed because of API shortages (brand name Adderall), higher demand and manufacturing delays.
    • Did a defense still learning Diaz’s language finally start rattling off declarative sentences using the future perfect tense after enduring the trauma of suddenly being asked to give a speech on Iran’s Nuclear Program and James Joyce against Oklahoma St and Oklahoma? Did the bye week serve as a Rosetta Stone for the front 7? Did some guys get healthy, get motivated, or quit thinking too much?
    • Also kind of cool that our leading rusher for the game was also our leading special teams tackler. Hats off, Joe Bergeron

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Advertisements
Categories: Uncategorized

daily 10/28/2011

October 28, 2011 Leave a comment
    • DeSean Hales-Jr
    • David Ash hit seemed to hit the proverbial freshman wall late last week and that carried over into practice early this week where the first year signal caller struggled with some bad read. Overall, he looked like a kid that was starting to get frustrated.
    • We’ve spoken to a person who’s on the headset and heard from players on the team after the Asset’s report, and both sets of sources confirmed that Case was so frustrated that he told our staff to play Ash to finish out the game
    • The Asset tells us that Mykelle Thompson is now spending all his time at safety, so the Adrian Phillips’ injury might be a boon to Case’s chances of getting some game action.
    • To take some pressure off the QB position, it sounds like the coaches are going to lean on a heavy dose of Captain America in the Wildcat look.
    • As for the rest of the position, Brown is going to get his 20 plus carries, but the coaches are hoping Joe Bergeron can break through his freshman wall.
    • We don’t need to help as much in pass pro as we do with Allen in the game and that has freed up our TE’s and backs to do some things.
    • It’s the reason Peat, Theus, and Arik Armstead are giving Texas a serious look—they’ll play right away.
    • At receiver, it’s still Davis and Shipley and cross your fingers. Onyegbule is a plus blocker, but they need him to take the next step as a route runner. Also, if you needed any more indication that Darius White’s days are numbered, look no further than this week’s game plan. You can expect to see…wait for it…a Desean Hales sighting,
    • “When you buy your first Kindle, you are marrying Jeff Bezos,” says Kobo General Manager Matt Welch
  • We worked with net books, LB made their own home page and RB made more monsters. We went to the library. RB planted seeds in the garden.

  • RBG had math choices in the math and science room. The Brainy Bunch wrote letters to the Great Pumpkin in literacy and made bags in math.

  • The Brainy Bunch received little parachute guys. There are 44 kids and 60 guys so some were left over. It was our story problem.

    • But all Backblaze wanted to do was write users’ data to hard disk and archive it long-term — they don’t even need to read the data very often. “We don’t need to do database transactions against our system,” Budman said. “The data is write-once, read-rarely.”

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized

daily 10/27/2011

October 27, 2011 Leave a comment
    • “Dude,” I said. “These people aren’t protesting money. They’re not protesting banking. They’re protesting corruption on Wall Street.”
    • Cain said he believed that the protesters are driven by envy of the rich.
    • Think about it: there have always been rich and poor people in America, so if this is about jealousy, why the protests now? The idea that masses of people suddenly discovered a deep-seated animus/envy toward the rich – after keeping it strategically hidden for decades – is crazy.
    • And we hate the rich? Come on. Success is the national religion, and almost everyone is a believer. Americans love winners.
    • And as much as we love the self-made success story, we hate the cheater that much more.
    • They just want a level playing field, and they want Wall Street to give up its cheat codes, things like:
    • It is virtually impossible to not make money in banking when you have unlimited access to free money, especially when the government keeps buying its own cash back from you at market rates.
    • The banks needed programs like TLGP because without them, the market rightly would have started charging more to lend to these idiots. Apparently, though, we can’t trust the free market when it comes to Bank of America, Goldman, Sachs, Citigroup, etc.
    • UNGRADUATED TAXES. I’ve already gone off on this more than once, but it bears repeating. Bankers on Wall Street pay lower tax rates than most car mechanics.
    • Bank of America last year paid not a single dollar in taxes — in fact, it received a “tax credit” of $1 billion. There are a slew of troubled companies that will not be paying taxes for years, including Citigroup and CIT.
    • Thank God our government decided to pledge $50 billion of your tax dollars to a rescue of General Motors! You just paid for one of the world’s biggest tax breaks.
    • Virtually all 2.3 million of those prisoners come from “the 99%.” Here is the number of bankers who have gone to jail for crimes related to the financial crisis: 0.
    • That means that every single time a bank kicked someone out of his home, a local police department got a cut. Local sheriff’s offices also get cuts of almost all credit card judgments, and other bank settlements
    • What this amounts to is the banks having, as allies, a massive armed police force who are always on call, ready to help them evict homeowners and safeguard the repossession of property.
    • But just see what happens when you try to call the police to prevent an improper foreclosure. Then, suddenly, the police will not get involved. It will be a “civil matter” and they won’t intervene.
    • Can anyone imagine a common thief being caught by police and sentenced to pay back half of what he took?
    • The point being: we have a massive police force in America that outside of lower Manhattan prosecutes crime and imprisons citizens with record-setting, factory-level efficiency, eclipsing the incarceration rates of most of history’s more notorious police states and communist countries.
    • They need something to exclude in order to feel included, but the sense of inclusion is false on several levels.
    • In each of Deckard’s intense experiences with Mercer he is truly alone. (174) Baudrillard says “We need a visible past, a visible continuum, a visible myth of origin to reassure us as to our ends, since ultimately we have never believed in them.” (1739) Once Deckard is outside the myth and continuum of Mercerism, he is able to truly meet and believe in Mercer himself.
    • “The Big 12 picked WVU on the strength of its program — period. Now the media reports that political games may upend that. That’s just flat wrong. I am doing and will do whatever it takes to get us back to the merits,” he said.

       

      West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin, in a statement e-mailed to The Associated Press, said an investigation might be in order.

    • “If these outrageous reports have any merit — and especially if a United States Senator has done anything inappropriate or unethical to interfere with a decision that the Big 12 had already made — then I believe that there should be an investigation in the U.S. Senate, and I will fight to get the truth ,” he said.
    • Oklahoma had eight sacks against the Longhorns. OSU had five.
    • The coaches do not anticipate anything resembling perfection. But they do expect more efficiency when the Longhorns — who rank 113th in red zone scoring — are in a position to score.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized

daily 10/26/2011

October 26, 2011 Leave a comment
    • t my last property which had just over 600 rooms, we generated almost $1m per year in revenue off of wi-fi.
    • but the reality is as long as it generates revenue it isn’t going to go away and you can barely get cell service here so unless you bring your own router, we include “complimentary” wired Internet as part of the “resort fee” you’re essentially SOL.
    • • The television audience for live sporting events grows more valuable to advertisers every day, as viewers watch entertainment programming via DVRs or downloads, skipping over the commercials. Few do that with live sports. As a result more broadcasters are jumping into the bidding wars for sporting events.
    • The Big East Conference reportedly turned down a contract worth more than $1 billion from ESPN, hoping for something more on the open market. That prompted Pittsburgh and Syracuse to seek admission to the ACC, where they will get more money rather than risk staying in a conference with no TV contract and the possibility of losing its membership in the BCS.
    • In a capitalist system, strong brands associate with each other for mutual benefit.
    • We’d suggest there should be a lot of other defenders of student athletes in line to do this work before ESPN, starting with college presidents.
    • “I don’t fault ESPN, they’re in the business to make money. I don’t fault the conferences, they’re in the business to make money for their schools,” Fulks said. “But when I look at Longhorn Network, I think that’s the worst of it, because all that money goes to one school at the expense of other schools.”
    • “There is great disparity historically, just like a lot of things in life,” he said. “In the business world strong brand tends to get stronger.”
    • “There’s no better way of signaling that your first obligation is to the audience than by reporting on stories that may portray a business partner in a negative light,” said Vince Doria, ESPN senior vice president and director of news.
    • When he laid out his picture of how Siri could become Apple’s platform to disintermediate Google (and, as a bonus, Microsoft) in the search advertising business, I wondered about a couple of things.  This disquisition revealed more about where Apple might go than anything I’d ever seen from him.
    • It turns out that the major databases people really care about are pretty finite: weather, food, maps, entertainment content, and a few other things.
    • They tell and retell stories, a disproportionate number of which turn on the phrase, But then I come to find out... .
    • And with that, in a rumbling drawl, JaMarcus Russell begins his defense of the outstanding charges.
    • (Says Lucas, “I don’t know where that [report] came from. JaMarcus is a good kid, I’m telling you, who just needs to find his motivation. But we still talk. Have him tell you about his sleep apnea. A lot [of his issues] come from that. And no one knows it.”)
    • Okay, fine, truth gets twisted. So how did the top pick in an NFL draft, with no physical injury, find himself out of the league at 24? How did a player so coveted become so unwanted so quickly? Analyze Russell’s downfall and you get an algorithm for bad luck, bad advice and bad decisions.
    • Was his laid-back nature a reflection of poise or apathy?
    • Great, but how many times a game does a guy throw 60 yards on the run?”
    • “There was no mentoring,” laments Russell’s aunt, Terry Green. Russell agrees, “Look at [Jets starter] Mark Sanchez and [veteran backup] Mark Brunell. Mark Brunell knows goddam well he ain’t going to come in the game. He’s there to help. I wish I’d had someone to do that.”
    • As for getting back, it’s a bit of a Hail Mary. “He’s only 26, and we all know the NFL’s appetite for quarterbacks,” says Lombardi, “but he needs to play, to go to Canada and show he can win, show his skills. He needs to take responsibility, say, ‘I [messed] up, and I’m interested in returning.’ If he wants to come back, it’s crazy he hasn’t done that.”
    • The gallery nods, ignoring the apparent contradictions. Russell leans in, practically whispering. “But want to know the truth?” he says. “I know that the game don’t owe me a damn thing.”
    • “Bezos has shown himself to be a long-term player,” said McIlroy, adding, “he’s supremely good at monetizing loss-leaders.”
    • At least Amazon is being honest with its intentions, said McQuivey, the analyst at Forrester. “They could pretend, as does Netflix, that they don’t see themselves as direct competitors and try to thus postpone the coming clash with publishers,” he said.
  • If you drop the shrinky dinkys they will brake! I In p.e. we did the same thing. And LBG received bat rings! 5LB

  • I won’t stop laughing if Chuck actually invites Houston. Their endowment is a pile of non-winning McDonald’s Monopoly pieces from 2003.

    • The people who took classes may have been more likely to complete the exercises. More than 80% of the participants in the self-care group reported reading some of the book and doing some exercises, but time spent on the exercises was typically less than the class groups. “They need that class format to get started,” Ms. Sherman said.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized

daily 10/25/2011

October 25, 2011 Leave a comment
    • Notre Dame, meanwhile, is seriously considering moving its non-football sports out of the Big East into the Big 12,
    • If Notre Dame does make such a move, it is being proposed that the Irish would remain independent in football but begin playing up to six football games against Big 12 competition.
    • Ubisoft’s plan isn’t working. Even after taking these drastic steps, the company says that 90 percent of the people who play its games are playing them illegally, according to Wedbush Morgan analyst Michael Pachter.
    • Gabe Newell, whose company runs the Steam digital game service, insists that this is in fact the case: Gamers often pirate for convenience, not finance.
    • Steam has revolutionized the way people buy and play games. It’s not just a digital storefront. Steam encourages customers to buy games, share them with friends and compete online for achievements. For those players, it becomes more fun to buy games than pirate them.
      • just like with ipad apps – i buy them bc i can use them anywhere
    • “We use the fact that we’re connected to 30 million users in order to measure the consequences of everything we do,” Newell said, noting that any game publisher can use the company’s Steamworks service to tap into data about how customers are behaving, then act accordingly.
    • Today managers use the Pareto principle, named for an Italian economist, to help them separate what Mr. Juran called the “vital few” resources from the “useful many.”
    • “His belief was that you always have a project to keep your mind going,” Mr. De Feo said. “He always had something to do.”
    • David Juran said his grandfather envisioned quality management becoming a field with the same type of recognition as accounting and economics, with academic degrees and professional certifications.
    • Maybe the company shouldn’t have spent $40 million, over the course of the third quarter, buying back 182,000 shares at an average price of $218 apiece. In early trading Tursday, shares are trading below $80 — down about 35% from Monday’s close.
    • Those decisions are, surely, the proximate cause for its torrid present. But the big-money deals show the same amount of arrogance, with even less business justification.
    • But why would Netflix spend hundreds of millions of dollars preventing movies and TV shows from being shown on HBO? That’s much less obvious.
    • Hastings decided that he was willing to pay eye-popping sums of money to turn his nonrival good into an excludable good: if he has it, then HBO can’t have it too.
    • Indeed, the whole DreamWorks deal, in particular, seems Pareto sub-optimal for all concerned.
    • Now, however, things are different. The market doesn’t trust Netflix to run itself efficiently and effectively any more, and deals like these are going to be scrutinized a lot more closely.
    • West Virginia is the Big East’s flagship football program, and losing its consistently strong performance will hurt the conference as it seeks to hold on to its automatic Bowl Championship Series spot.
    • The absence of salespeople in C-level positions perhaps reflects the fact that twenty years ago, when it was fashionable to promote top sales people to the CEO slot, the results were frequently catastrophic.
    • The reason sales people tend to make poor C-level executives is that sales is a tactical, short-term business whereas C-level folks are tasked with strategic decision-making and guidance.
    • Of course his definition of “running a business” was not financial manipulation, but revenue growth.
    • American retailers have cut sales staff to the point where they are probably missing out on business.
    • In Asia the personal touch is essential. Amway, a direct-selling firm, counts China as its biggest market.
    • Selling in Korea, according to a saying among Korean salespeople, means drinking a lot of soju, a fiery local spirit, and “getting naked” when appropriate.
    • Management theory mostly ignores selling. Peter Drucker, perhaps the most influential guru, wrote that “the aim of marketing is to make selling superfluous.”
    • Companies are reorganising sales so that their most important customers are cosseted by huge, complex selling teams which include people from many departments.
    • Japanese salesmen are typically paid a salary only.
    • Whether they are called “rainmakers” (an investment banking term) or “peddlers”, whether their feet are on the street or in the door, whether they are pushing metal (cars) or slamming boxes (photocopiers), salespeople are the unsung heroes of business.
    • They gather vital intelligence about customers’ preferences and competitors’ moves.
    • Spare a thought for the world’s Willy Lomans, riding on a smile and a shoeshine.
    • “We need to be a running football team that throws the ball deep,” Mack Brown said. “We’d like to confuse people with motion and sets and shifting, and we’ve been able to do that. Speed sweeps have been very effective.
    • Offensive co-coordinator Bryan Harsin said the line and backs “are getting more comfortable working together.”

       

      “It’s just a matter of repetition,” Harsin said. “And the more reps they get, the better they’ve got.”

    • “I don’t know what goes on in coach Harsin’s head,” Walters said, “but I like to think he can see us running the ball pretty well and that he’d like to go to that first.”
    • The theory is that players who don’t get recognized ought to figure out why not and work hard to turn it around, or their starting jobs might be in jeopardy.
    • But it is more than just receptions with these players. One of the keys to co-offensive coordinator Bryan Harsin’s scheme is the blocking ability of the tight end. Matthews, who had a knee injury and missed some crucial practices, could be that player.
    • This made complicated and high-paced offensive playbooks more common at the high school and college levels, which is now bubbling up to the NFL.
    • These games nowadays are just so technically sound that they’re a learning tool,” says Tim Grunhard, an All-Pro center for the Kansas City Chiefs in the 1990s who now coaches high school football in the Kansas City area, where he encourages his players to use Madden to improve their knowledge of football strategy and tactics.
    • The ease of watching video on tablet computers has made them increasingly popular with players and scouts, but experiments by the Ravens and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers hint at an N.F.L. future in which the devices could play a more prominent role. Beyond their function as playbooks, tablet devices can act as film sessions, nutrition guides and work calendars.
    • Fans use mobile devices to watch multiple games at once and to analyze data in real time.
    • Any device that can record or play video cannot be used during pregame preparations or the game itself, nor can “any type of computer.” Coaches and players are allowed to view photographs, but binoculars are banned from the sidelines. The Ravens and the Bucs, therefore, have to turn off their tablets before they take the field. This is not an issue when all that is in the computers are the playbooks, which are primarily used during the week. But it would be a barrier to the kinds of expansive uses that some envision.
    • If an incorrect password is entered three times, the app destroys the data on the computer.
    • Nick Fusee, the Ravens’ director of information technology, said the team’s technological foray began last year, shortly after Baltimore’s offensive coordinator, Cam Cameron, bought an iPad for personal use and asked Fusee to make an application that would serve as a playbook. T
    • Ravens center Matt Birk noted that his younger teammates seemed to enjoy the new playbooks, but that at age 35 he was used to his routine and was loath to give up the notebook and pencil that serve as the main tools for his weekly preparation. He took some satisfaction when he realized how hard it was to type out detailed notes on the iPad’s glass screen.  
  • Where communication and understanding is absent, assumptions and destructive reactions exist.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized

daily 10/24/2011

October 24, 2011 Leave a comment
    • “His eyes,” said talk show host Conan O’Brien. “He has the dead, cold eyes of a doll … It’s how, actually, I fell in love with him. He has the same eyes as Charles Grodin and the shark from Jaws.”
    • Mack Brown’s program is still in a transitional phase in the era of recruiting parity.  Taking your 25 favorite players each year isn’t going to be enough going forward. 
    • The Horns are playing catch up in the development department and may lack the fire power to prevail in shootouts with Tech, A&M and Baylor.  They’re Kansas State lite right now, but could be doing it better by the time that game rolls around due to athleticism.
    • “That’s because we’ve lost the battle in Iraq with the Iraqi government. We’ve lost this sphere of influence that we had.”
    • Protecting American forces from Iraqi law. We’ve lost the battle with the Iraq government. That’s quite a turn from the battle we originally claimed to be waging. But Gingrich’s and Santorum’s gripes are nothing compared to Michele Bachmann’s rage. On Face the Nation she fumed:
    • We’ve put a lot of deposit into this situation with Iraq. And to think that we are so disrespected and they have so little fear of the United States that there would be nothing that we would gain from this … We are there as the nation that liberated these people. And that’s the thanks that the United States is getting after 4,400 lives were expended and over $800 billion? And so on the way out, we’re being kicked out of the country? I think this is absolutely outrageous.
    • Deposit. Disrespected. Kicked out. No gain. No fear of the United States. So much for all that talk of sovereignty, democracy, and the rule of law. For Bachmann, our military presence in Iraq isn’t about liberation. It’s about empire. She even demanded that Iraq “reimburse the United States fully for the amount of money that we have spent to liberate these people.”
    • Stick with the devil you know. Don’t use force unless it’s in your interest. Demand gains from your investment. Make your hosts fear you. Dismiss their resistance as inauthentic. There’s nothing new in this way of thinking about the world, or in betraying the promises you made during your invasion. It’s the way dictators and emperors have always treated their conquests. What’s laughable is the right’s attempt to pass it off as moral.
    • “He said he no longer wanted to go out, no longer wanted to travel the world. He would focus on the products. He knew the couple of things he wanted to do, which was the iPhone and then the iPad. He had a few other visions. I think he would’ve loved to have conquered television.”
    • “I saw my life as an arc and that it would end, and compared to that nothing mattered,” Jobs told him in one recorded interview. “You’re born alone, you’re going to die alone. And does anything else really matter? I mean, what is it exactly is it that you have to lose, Steve? You know? There’s nothing.”
    • “He said, ‘From then on, I realized that I was not — just abandoned. I was chosen. I was special,’ ” Isaacson said. “And I think that’s the key to understanding Steve Jobs.”
    • “But ever since I’ve had cancer, I’ve been thinking about it more. And I find myself believing a bit more. I kind of — maybe it’s ‘cause I want to believe in an afterlife. That when you die, it doesn’t just all disappear. The wisdom you’ve accumulated. Somehow it lives on.’ “
    • Simon & Schuster says that although Jobs cooperated with the book, he asked for no control over what was written nor the right to read it before it was published.
    • He held meetings with major publishers about partnering with Apple, the book says. If textbooks were given away free on iPads he thought the publishers could get around the state certification of textbooks. Mr. Isaacson said Mr. Jobs believed that states would struggle with a weak economy for at least a decade. “We can give them an opportunity to circumvent that whole process and save money,” he told Mr. Isaacson.
    • Another potential “One more thing…” for Jobs is apparently digital textbooks for the iPad. “Mr. Jobs’s biographer Walter Isaacson says in the book that Mr. Jobs viewed textbooks as the next business he wanted to transform,” Damon Darlin and Nick Wingfield reveal on The New York Times’ Bit blog. Jobs apparently went as far as having meetings with publishers about partnering with Apple to make this happen. And he was thinking about ways of circumventing state certification requirements (a tricky issue in the textbook market).
    • Torre defended the umpire’s work and desire for perfection, but he also had a good anecdote about a time he was arguing a base call with 21-year National League umpire Dutch Rennert. A livid Torre once had a beef with a Rennert call and told him, “How is it that you are such a great balls-and-strikes umpire and so bad on the bases,” Torre said. “Dutch looked and me and said, ‘Yeah, isn’t that something?’ I just walked away.”
    • Oh, and his house—that has not helped, either. Milner, who runs his business from a no-frills office suite in Moscow, is spending more and more time in the Valley and so has bought a place in Los Altos Hills—not just the Valley’s most expensive house but, at a reported $100 million, among the most expensive in America.
    • Does Milner’s success suggest that the rest of the world is starting to horn in on what has been, to date, as American as apple pie—the Internet future and Internet riches?
    • After the collapse of the Soviet Union, a class of robber barons—the oligarchs—rose to control much of Russia’s vast resources.
    • A not inconsiderable point: A disproportionate number of the oligarchs are Jewish. The Jews in Soviet Russia, often kept from taking official career paths, came to thrive in the gray and black markets. Hence, they were among the only capitalists in Russia when capitalism emerged.
    • He goes to work for the now imprisoned Putin enemy and founder of Yukos, then Russia’s largest oil company, Mikhail Khodorkovsky, who in the mid-’90s was in the process of devouring, some would say by extraordinary means, great parts of the Russian economy.
    • Milner proposes to Khodorkovsky that they try a legal takeover—American style, and the first ever in Russia—of a candy company.
    • The theory holds that the Internet is an advertising medium where users themselves create the vast amount of content. In other words, as Milner understands it, the same ocean of advertising revenues that have gone to traditional media might now go to the Internet, but without the offsetting costs of having to actually create content. Voilá.

       

      “From margin standpoint,” Milner notes, “this is very magical.”

    • Correction: Through Mail.ru, he does know the Goldman Sachs money guys in Russia.
    • Pre-IPO investments in even high-flying tech companies that are not yet profitable usually conform to a specific pattern: A prestigious VC firm gets certain preferences when it invests (i.e., it gets its money out first should the company go public) and gets seats on the board (which means it gets a direct voice in the future of the company—almost always one that advocates an IPO as soon as possible). Milner offers something radically or foolishly different: an investment with no such preferences and no board seats. In effect, his money is like IPO money—no advantages for regular shareholders—without the burden of an IPO (the time suck of a road show, the administrative costs of being public, the short-term earnings pressure of the market).
    • The proposal represents, too, a philosophically new and audacious view: Once a company reaches a certain size—a billion-dollar valuation by Milner’s reckoning—its investment profile changes. It holds enough market share and has established enough brand identity that it represents significantly less risk than VCs have traditionally considered startups to have.
    • Sitting in the Four Seasons, I don’t come out and say, “Facebook has taken Russian money, so what does that tell you about the state of the industry and the state of social media? It tells you that social media is probably not such a great investment.” But it’s certainly what I’m thinking.
    • “Same. Social is a better way to interact with digital world. It is better than search. Implications for … everything. Total change.”
    • for a period of time he has gotten one thing: a right of first refusal on any other Facebook stock that changes hands.
    • In fact, he has become something of a ubiquitous figure, speaking at every technology conference.
    • His phone rings. Conversation ends. I read the answer to my question in the paper a day or so later. Google has reportedly made a $3 billion bid for Twitter, which was countered by a bid for a stake in the company from Kleiner Perkins that valued the business at $3.7 billion, which in turn was countered by a bid from Milner that valued the company at $4.2 billion. Twitter takes the Kleiner money at nearer the Milner valuation—until eight months later, when it takes the Milner money, too, although this time at an amount that values the company at $8.4 billion.
    • Milner says that even for him, a couple of billion in 60 days is a lot, but he’ll deal.
    • Milner, not only the largest outside investor in one of the world’s most sought-after companies but, thanks to his relationship with Zuckerberg, one of its gatekeepers, cuts Goldman into the deal.
    • Like much of Russian capitalism, it’s an insular imitation of something else—in this case, the World Economic Forum in Davos.
    • These are the people I should call on to speak for the Russian view; this is who I should call on to speak for the American view; this for the international view; and Milner for the view in between.
    • “Welcome, Mr. President. It is an honor to have you join our session. May we invite you to join our panel?”
    • There is always something vaguely oppositional about the relationship VCs have with the companies they invest in. They are trying to maximize their positions, to pay as little as possible and cash out for as much as possible.
    • Next year, in Scotland, Milner tells me, he will host a gathering of all the Internet companies in the world that have a valuation of more than $1 billion—he is setting the agenda, reordering the power structure.
    • The men, World War I veterans who could not find jobs, became known as the Bonus Army—for the modest government bonus they were owed for their service.
    • Father Charles Coughlin, the populist “Radio Priest” who became a phenomenon for railing against “greedy bankers and financiers,” framed Washington’s double standard this way: “If the government can pay $2 billion to the bankers and the railroads, why cannot it pay the $2 billion to the soldiers?”
    • Even so, good behavior by the Bonus Army did not prevent the U.S. Army’s hotheaded chief of staff, General Douglas MacArthur, from summoning an overwhelming force to evict it from Pennsylvania Avenue late that July. After assaulting the veterans and thousands of onlookers with tear gas, ­MacArthur’s troops crossed the bridge and burned down the encampment.
    • Apparently some of those dopey kids, staggering under student loans and bereft of job prospects, have lots of parents and friends of all ages who understand exactly what they’re talking about.
    • Barack Obama publicly acknowledged the demonstrators’ “broad-based frustration about how our financial system works.” (If Bloomberg and Obama are both using “frustration,” you can be certain it is a focus-group-tested trope chosen not to frighten the presumed sensibilities of independents.)
      • I like to do political focus groups
    • The right’s angry class warriors constitute the vast majority of the GOP—that roughly three-­quarters of the party that seems determined to resist Romney no matter what.
    • “There is perhaps no greater image of irony,” wrote the conservative blogger Michelle Malkin, “than that of anti-capitalist, anti-corporate, anti-materialist extremists of the Occupy Wall Street movement paying tribute to Steve Jobs.”
    • Yet those demonstrators who celebrated Jobs were not necessarily hypocrites at all—and no more anti-capitalist than the Bonus Army of 1932. If you love your Mac and iPod, you can still despise CDOs and credit-default swaps. Jobs’s genius—in the words of Regis McKenna, a Silicon Valley marketing executive who worked with him early on—was his ability “to strip away the excess layers of business, design, and innovation until only the simple, elegant reality remained.”
      • it’s a war on complexity
    • Back in 1931, even Hoover worried that “timid people, black with despair” had “lost faith in the American system” and might be susceptible to the kind of revolutions that had become a spreading peril abroad.
    • Everyone just assumes the fix is in for the highest bidder, no matter what. Take—please!—the latest bipartisan Beltway panacea: the congressional supercommittee charged by the president and GOP leaders to hammer out the deficit-reduction compromise they couldn’t do on their own.
    • Crucially, by identifying the architecture of global economic power, the analysis could help make it more stable. By finding the vulnerable aspects of the system, economists can suggest measures to prevent future collapses spreading through the entire economy. Glattfelder says we may need global anti-trust rules, which now exist only at national level, to limit over-connection among TNCs. Sugihara says the analysis suggests one possible solution: firms should be taxed for excess interconnectivity to discourage this risk.
    • Newcomers to any network connect preferentially to highly connected members.
    • If connectedness clusters, so does wealth, says Dan Braha of NECSI: in similar models, money flows towards the most highly connected members. The Zurich study, says Sugihara, “is strong evidence that simple rules governing TNCs give rise spontaneously to highly connected groups”. Or as Braha puts it: “The Occupy Wall Street claim that 1 per cent of people have most of the wealth reflects a logical phase of the self-organising economy.”
    • Any debate inside the corridors of power about using tactical nukes will be heightened by the intelligence buzz surrounding bin Laden’s possible ownership of Russian nuclear “suitcase” bombs purchased from Chechen mafia.
    • Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah quizzed Napolitano about allegations that the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency thinks that apprehended illegal immigrants “deserve their own barbershop.”

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized

daily 10/22/2011

October 22, 2011 Leave a comment
    • Nathan’s not wrong here. I work with statisticians who couldn’t program their way out of a paper bag. They think their strength is knowing what SAS procedure to run to get a p-value. And they do expect the data that reaches them to be analysis-ready. This may represent a minority of statisticians, to be sure, but the mindset _is_ out there.
    • Many government and industries split data analysis between two groups. The “statistical programmers” who use ETL to extract, clean, and prepare the data, and the statisticians who swoop in to carry out the analysis using pre-approved, established, methods. These statisticians can do much of their job by using a software GUI, simple scripting, or a procedure-based analysis in SAS. Since they have a team of programmers working with them, they don’t have to do any programming themselves.
    • Google RSS reader – post by Mathieu DAmours
    • El lector de noticias de Google es a día de hoy una de las mejores opciones disponibles en Internet y actualmente mi elección personal después de haber pasado por decenas de lectores RSS.
      – post by Jose Luis Pajares
    • The google RSS reader – post by Adam Posey
    • My favor rss reader and the best ever met
      – post by gneheix il
    • Best RSS reader ever! – post by Michael
    • [en] Google RSS Reader – 谷歌免费的在线新闻阅读器, 简洁, 速度无可匹敌, 暂不支持中文标签 – post by Wind Cold
    • Excellent online feed reader. – post by Casey Atherton
    • Can’t live without it!
      – post by pellefjant
    • My #1 page. Can’t live without it! – post by Björn Israelsson
    • 这句话不错,如果有人说他不“人云亦云”,我就告诉他:可怜的孩子,环境让你变得偏执起来 – post by mhye
    • As others have mentioned, this is the best online RSS reader. For me, the biggest reason was speed — even on my iPhone articles load very quickly! – post by Edward Rios
    • revisit those two links. Pretty cool! – post by d baad
    • Compelling enough for me to create a blog about it: http://epiphanysuit.blogspot.com/
      (mobile version: http://www.feedm8.com/epiphanysuit) – post by Eric Herberholz
    • ubantu和ARM有什么关系?? – post by ye zhaohua
    • lol – post by Thomas Klug

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Categories: Uncategorized